The Star usually does not publish mugshots. But there are exceptions — and this is one

hayat
The Star usually does not publish mugshots. But there are exceptions and this is one

The Star usually does not publish mugshots. But there are exceptions and this is one

Shedding Light on a Controversial Decision

In 2020, The Kansas City Star, owned by the McClatchy Company, made a pivotal decision to cease the routine publication of booking mugshots. This departure from traditional journalistic practices was a significant move, sparking debates about the ethics and implications of mugshot publication.

The Star usually does not publish mugshots. But there are exceptions and this is one
The Star usually does not publish mugshots. But there are exceptions and this is one

 

The Star usually does not publish mugshots. This decision was rooted in two primary reasons: First, at the time of booking, the person being photographed has been charged but not convicted. This means that in some cases, published mugshots are permanently available for people acquitted of the crimes for which they were charged. Second, beyond the personal impact, inappropriate publication of mugshots disproportionately harms people of color and those with mental illness.

Factors Considered in the Decision-Making Process

When determining whether to use a mugshot, The Star considers several crucial questions: Is the accused a public official? Is the community at risk if the mugshot is not published? Is the crime committed of such high profile that the public’s right to know must prevail?

Recent Events and Exceptions

Despite its general policy, The Star has made exceptions in certain cases. Last week’s deadly mass shooting at Kansas City’s Super Bowl rally and celebration prompted The Star to publish a mugshot of Lyndell Mays of Raytown, one of the two adult men charged with second-degree felony murder. The publication also intends to publish a mugshot of Dominic M. Miller of Kansas City when one becomes available.

Conclusion

The decision by The Kansas City Star and the McClatchy Company to limit the publication of booking mugshots reflects a nuanced approach to journalism. While balancing the public’s right to know and the potential harm to individuals, The Star aims to maintain ethical standards in its reporting.

Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *